Native Plant Resources

 

Native Plant Resources:

Find a native plant website by General Information or by state: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia.

General Information

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay
Over its 40-year history, the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay has focused on building partnerships, connecting people to the Bay, its rivers, and local watersheds, and healing the land and water through hands-on conservation. Through these efforts, healthy streams and rivers, quality communities, and a healthy economy can be a reality.
Conservation Landscaping
Native Meadow
Lawn and Garden Care

Audubon At Home
Audubon’s Mission: To conserve and restore natural ecosystems, focusing on birds, other wildlife, and their habitats for the benefit of humanity and the earth’s biological diversity.
For more than a century, Audubon has built a legacy of conservation success by mobilizing the strength of its network of members, Chapters, Audubon Centers, state offices and dedicated professional staff to connect people with nature and the power to protect it.
A powerful combination of science, education and policy expertise combine in efforts ranging from protection and restoration of local habitats to the implementation of policies that safeguard birds, other wildlife and the resources that sustain us all–in the U.S. and Across the Americas.
Audubon Guide to a Healthy Yard and Beyond

Bringing Nature Home How you can sustain wildlife with native plants.
If you want to create ecosystems with a diversity of animal species, we first have to encourage a healthy diversity of plants. It’s simple: By gardening with native plants — no matter where you live or how small or large your space is — you can help sustain wildlife. This is the groundbreaking book written by entomologist Prof. Douglas Tallamy.

Center for Biological Diversity, Native Plant Conservation Campaign
The Native Plant Conservation Campaign (NPCC) is a national network of affiliate native plant societies, botanical gardens, and other plant conservation organizations. We collaborate to exchange information, and create a strong national voice to advocate for native plant species and community conservation through

  • Equal funding and protection for plants and other species in conservation law and practice
  • improved staffing and funding for plant conservation and research,
  • stronger Federal laws for conservation of native plants and ecosystems
  • prevention and control of infestation by invasive exotic plants
  • use of local native plants in restoration and gardening

NPCC also performs independent research, and publishes reports, literature reviews, brochures, and digests discussing scientific and legal issues in plant conservation.

Chesapeake Bay Program
The Chesapeake Bay Program is a regional partnership that leads and directs Chesapeake Bay restoration and protection. Bay Program partners include federal and state agencies, local governments, non-profit organizations and academic institutions. Staff members work at the Bay Program’s Annapolis, Maryland, office and at partner organizations throughout the Bay watershed.
Better Backyard: A Citizen’s Resource Guide to Beneficial Landscaping and Habitat Restoration in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (Downloadable pdf)

Chesapeake Bay Foundation
Founded in 1967, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) is the largest independent conservation organization dedicated solely to saving the Bay. Serving as a watchdog, we fight for effective, science-based solutions to the pollution degrading the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers and streams. Our motto, “Save the Bay,” is a regional rallying cry for pollution reduction throughout the Chesapeake’s six-state, 64,000-square-mile watershed, which is home to more than 17 million people and 3,000 species of plants and animals.
More Things You Can Do to Save the Bay
In Your Yard

Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council
The Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council is a coalition of individuals and organizations dedicated to researching, promoting and educating professionals and the public about conservation landscaping to protect the Chesapeake Bay. The Council formed in 2003 to promote the principles of conservation landscaping and expand the practice of conservation landscaping throughout the Chesapeake Bay region. In 2009, the Council became a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization and in 2010, elected its first Board of Directors. The Board of Directors meets quarterly and meetings, including the October annual meeting, are open to the public.
The Eight Essential Elements of Conservation Landscaping: view the pdf here.

EcoBeneficial!
EcoBeneficial! is a horticulture communications and consulting company founded by Kim Eierman.  The company is dedicated to improving our environment by promoting ecological landscaping and the use of native plants.
Many of our traditional gardening and landscaping practices have contributed to unhealthy ecosystems.  The American love affair with exotic turf lawns is just one example of how we have compromised our environment, the environment that we humans depend upon.  At EcoBeneficial!, we think that it is time to think and act differently in our landscapes!
Through blogging, videos, podcasts, public presentations, freelance writing, and consulting, EcoBeneficial! empowers homeowners, seasoned gardeners and green industry pros to make dramatic, positive impacts on the environment.  Simple changes can make huge differences.  It all starts with an ecosystem approach.

The Humane Gardener
Have you heard that most of our 4,000 native bee species nest not in hives but in the ground or dead wood? Did you know that caterpillars, not birdseed, are an essential part of most baby bird diets? Are you familiar with the gardening prowess of opossums and skunks, who devour insects often considered “pests”? Traditional cultivation practices all too often ignore the needs and valuable contributions of our fellow species, exploiting myths and fears about the animals and plants living among us. Learn why rejecting this dominant paradigm is so important to a healthy environment—and how partnering with nature through native plantings, gentle cultivation, and humane conflict resolution can bring new life and beauty to your own backyard.

Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
The mission of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is to increase the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes.
LBJWC Native Plant Database
Search for nearly 8,000 native plants by scientific or common name or choose a particular family of plants.

Landscape for Life
Landscape For Life is based on the principles of the Sustainable Sites Initiative ™ (SITES™), the nation’s first rating system for sustainable landscapes. SITES™ is an interdisciplinary effort led by the American Society of Landscape Architects, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at The University of Texas at Austin, and the United States Botanic Garden in conjunction with a diverse group of stakeholder organizations.

The Living Landscape, by Richard Darke and Douglas Tallamy, 2013.  Timber Press.

National Wildlife Federation: Garden for Wildlife
National Wildlife Federation is a voice for wildlife, dedicated to protecting wildlife and habitat and inspiring the future generation of conservationists.
We believe that helping wildlife survive the challenges of the 21st century like climate change and habitat loss is best done by:

  • Working with diverse groups to achieve our common conservation goals.
  • Forming resilient and sustainable solutions to problems facing our environment and wildlife.
  • Focusing on the future of conservation as well as the present, to ensure America’s wildlife legacy lives on.

NWF: Certify your wildlife garden

Native Plant Network
Our goal is to provide technical and practical information on the growing and planting of North American (Canada, US, and Mexico) native plants for restoration, conservation, reforestation, landscaping, roadsides, and so on.

The Natural Web: Exploring Nature’s Connections
The Natural Web is dedicated to exploring, understanding and enjoying the plants and critters who surround us, and the intricate connections among them, and with us. Mary Ann Borge is a freelance naturalist, writer, photographer and educator, living in New Jersey. 

The Nature Conservancy
The Nature Conservancy is the leading conservation organization working around the world to protect ecologically important lands and waters for nature and people.
Everyday Environmentalist: Garden With Native Plants

North American Native Plant Society, Canada
NANPS is a volunteer-operated registered charitable organization concerned with preserving native plant habitat in wild areas and restoring indigenous flora to developed areas.
Our key purpose is to provide information and inspire an appreciation of native plants with an aim to restoring healthy ecosystems across the continent.
It is our belief that nature belongs in urban, suburban, and rural areas as much as in remote areas.

North American Pollinator Protection Campaign Pollinator Partnership
The Pollinator Partnership’s mission is to promote the health of pollinators, critical to food and ecosystems, through conservation, education, and research. Signature initiatives include the, NAPPC (North American Pollinator Protection Campaign), National Pollinator Week, and the Ecoregional Planting Guides.
Selecting Plants for Pollinators: Adirondack New England Mixed Forest (Downloadable pdf)
Selecting Plants for Pollinators: Southeastern Mixed Forest Province (Downloadable pdf)
Selecting Plants for Pollinators: Central Appalachian Broadleaf Forest (Downloadable pdf)
Selecting Plants for Pollinators: Eastern Broadleaf Forest, Continental Province (Downloadable pdf)
Selecting Plants for Pollinators: Eastern Broadleaf Forest, Oceanic Province (Downloadable pdf)
Selecting Plants for Pollinators: Laurentian Mixed Forest Province (Downloadable pdf)
Selecting Plants for Pollinators: Outer Coastal Plain Mixed Province (Downloadable pdf)

PlantNative
PlantNative is dedicated to moving native plants and naturescaping into mainstream landscaping practices. We believe this promotes biodiversity, preserves our natural heritage, reduces pollution and enhances livability. Our goal is to work with nursery owners, landscape professionals and consumers to increase public awareness of native plants and related landscaping practices and to increase both the supply of and demand for native plants.

Stewardship Garden
Our yard, located in Central New York, is more than just a place to sit and relax, more than just a garden.
It’s a habitat where birds, butterflies, bees, toads, and other little creatures can find food, water, cover, and a place to raise their young; a place where there are no pesticides or herbicides used that would be unhealthy for these creatures or for people.
It’s the kind of place you, too, can have in your own yard, whether you have an apartment balcony, a city lot, or acreage in the country.
It’s a place that’s full of life—a very exciting place to be.

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Natural Resources Conservation Service
Originally established by Congress in 1935 as the Soil Conservation Service (SCS), NRCS has expanded to become a conservation leader for all natural resources, ensuring private lands are conserved, restored, and more resilient to environmental challenges, like climate change.
Seventy percent of the land in the United States is privately owned, making stewardship by private landowners absolutely critical to the health of our Nation’s environment.
NRCS works with landowners through conservation planning and assistance designed to benefit the soil, water, air, plants, and animals that result in productive lands and healthy ecosystems.
Natural Resources Conservation Service: Backyard Conservation
Plants Database The PLANTS Database provides standardized information about the vascular plants, mosses, liverworts, hornworts, and lichens of the U.S. and its territories.
Backyard Conservation (Downloadable pdf – pages 1-14)
Backyard Conservation (Downloadable pdf – pages 15-28)

US Fish and Wildlife Service
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is a bureau within the Department of the Interior. Our mission is to work with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.
Native Plant Center, Chesapeake Region
Pollinators
Attracting Pollinators to Your Garden (Downloadable pdf)
Native Plants for Wildlife Habitat and Conservation Landscaping, Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Native Plants for Wildlife Habitat and Conservation Landscaping, Chesapeake Bay Watershed (Downloadable pdf — note: 85 pages)

US Forest Service: Celebrating Wildflowers
Celebrating Wildflowers is dedicated to the enjoyment of the thousands of wildflowers growing on our national forests and grasslands, and to educating the public about the many values of native plants.
Celebrating Wildflowers emphasizes:

  • The aesthetic value of plants – a field of wildflowers is a beautiful sight
  • The recreational value of plants – picking berries is fun for the whole family
  • The biological value of plants – native plants support other life
  • The medicinal value of plants – chemicals from plants help combat sickness
  • The economic value of plants – plant material such as floral greens are commercially valuable
  • The conservation of native plants – protecting and maintaining native plant habitat

Wild Ones: Native Plants, Natural Landscapes
Wild Ones Vision for Our Future: Wild Ones strives to become a widely recognized voice for native plants and the sustainable landscaping movement, promoting increased use of native plantings that create living landscapes through grassroots efforts by example, education, marketing, and personalized support.

  • We will raise public awareness regarding the benefits that native plants, including trees, shrubs, wildflowers and grasses, offer in a variety of settings so landscaping with native plants becomes the norm rather than the exception.
  • We will persuade the general public that including native plants in home and public landscapes is aesthetically pleasing and healthier for our environment, and that reducing unnecessary turf grass reduces storm water runoff and unnecessary use of water, fuel, and lawn chemicals.
  • We will see the use of native plants extend into an increasing number of areas where plants touch the soil – such as pollinator support and public places.
  • We will join forces with others to preserve native plants and biodiversity from loss due to development and other forces, including displacement by non-native invasive plants.

Gardening for Life by Doug Tallamy (Downloadable pdf)
Grow it!  Don’t Mow It by Bret Rappaport (Downloadable pdf)
Nativars (Native Cultivars): Where do they fit in? (Downloadable pdf)
Native Caterpillars, Moths and Butterflies and Host Native Woodies (Downloadable pdf)

The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation
The Xerces Society is a nonprofit organization that protects wildlife through the conservation of invertebrates and their habitat. For forty years, the Society has been at the forefront of invertebrate protection worldwide, harnessing the knowledge of scientists and the enthusiasm of citizens to implement conservation programs.
Pollinator Conservation Resources — Mid-Atlantic Region
Mid-Atlantic Pollinator Plant List (Downloadable pdf)
Milkweed: A Conservation Practitioner’s Guide (Downloadable pdf)
Plant Ecology, Seed Production Methods, and Habitat Restoration Opportunities

Delaware

Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control
It’s the mission of the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control to protect and manage the state’s vital natural resources, protect public health and safety, provide quality outdoor recreation and to serve and educate the citizens of the First State about the wise use, conservation and enhancement of Delaware’s Environment.
Rare Vascular Plants of Delaware

Delaware Invasive Species Council
About DIS: An invasive species is an alien species whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health according to the National Invasive Species Monitoring Plan. The spread of invasive species is a pervasive and growing problem within Delaware and the United States.
The Delaware Invasive Species Council, Inc. (DISC) was formed to help Delaware deal with this rapidly growing problem.
Livable Plants for the Home Landscape (Downloadable pdf)

Delaware Native Plant Society
Welcome to the Delaware Native Plant Society (DSPN). We are a volunteer-based, publicly supported, non-profit organization dedicated to the use, propagation, promotion, and conservation of native plants and their natural habitats through education, science, advocacy, and land stewardship. The Society was created on 18 March 1998 and we have made some great progress over the years in the realization of our vision statement. But we need the concerned public to maintain this trend as your membership strengthens the Society’s role as the voice for our native plants. We encourage you to browse around this site, join the Society, attend some meetings, and then get involved in one of only a handful of organizations in the Mid-Atlantic region that are dedicated to improving the natural habitats of Delaware, and your own backyard, through the use of native plants.

Delaware Nature Society
Founded in 1964, the Delaware Nature Society is the pre-eminent non-profit environmental organization in the state. This position has been well earned through its long-term and consistently active preservation, conservation and advocacy programs. Delaware Nature Society is unique in the way it integrates education as a vital element in its role in preservation, conservation and advocacy.
SmartYards Campaign

University of Delaware Cooperative Extension
University of Delaware Cooperative Extension connects the public with university knowledge, research and resources to address youth, family, community and agricultural needs.
Livable Plants for the Home Landscape (Downloadable pdf)
Native Plants for Delaware Landscapes (Downloadable pdf)

USDA-NRCS and Delaware Department of Agriculture guide to Delaware native plants that support native bees. Includes information on the whys and hows of bee habitat and features photographs and cultural requirements for each of the 39 plants.
Delaware Native Plants for Native Bees (Downloadable pdf)

District of Columbia

Audubon Naturalist Society, Washington DC Area
ANS Mission: The Audubon Naturalist Society inspires residents of the greater Washington, DC, region to appreciate, understand, and protect their natural environment through outdoor experiences, education, and advocacy.
ANS Vision: The Audubon Naturalist Society seeks to create a larger and more diverse community of people who treasure the natural world and work to preserve it.

Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press, Grasses of Washington, D.C. by Kamal M. Ibrahim, Paul M. Peterson (Author)
A vegetative key, descriptions, and illustrations for the identification of 182 native and naturalized grasses that occur in Washington, D.C., are presented. In addition, we provide a glossary of terms and indexes to scientific and common names. The key is based on vegetative characters to allow identification of specimens that primarily do not have flowering structures (inflorescences and spikelets).

Maryland

Maryland Department of Natural Resources: Wild Acres
Maryland’s Wild Acres is a voluntary program that encourages Maryland citizens to create backyard wildlife habitat. Backyard wildlife habitat can increase food and shelter for wildlife, control soil erosion, reduce sediment in waterways, conserve water, improve water quality, inspire stewardship and beautify the landscape. The goal of the Wild Acres program is to create backyard habitats across the State that maximize wildlife benefits and highlight conservation stewardship. Backyard wildlife habitat can include decks, yards, large lots and everything in between. The Wild Acres program offers fact sheets on how landowners can enhance their habitat for
wildlife by creating food, water and shelter resources.

Maryland Native Plant Society
The Maryland Native Plant Society’s mission is to promote awareness, appreciation, and conservation of Maryland’s native plants and their habitats. We pursue our mission through education, research, advocacy, and service activities.
Membership is open to all who are interested in Maryland’s native plants and their habitats.

University of Maryland Extension, Home and Garden Information Center
Our Vision:People gardening and managing land in harmony with nature. Our Mission: Develop and deliver science-based, sustainable gardening and integrated pest management education for better human and environmental health.
Native Plants
Reduce Lawn Area
Attracting Wildlife

New Jersey

D&R Greenway Land Trust, New Jersey
D&R Greenway Land Trust’s mission is to:

  • Preserve and protect a permanent network of natural lands and open spaces, creating the conditions for a healthy and diverse environment to flourish
  • Provide the public with appropriate access to these areas, encouraging active lifestyles and a greater appreciation of the natural world
  • Inspire a conservation ethic promoting policies, educational programs and partnerships that result in a public commitment to land preservation

Duke Farms Living Habitats
Duke Farms serves as a model of environmental stewardship and inspires visitors to become informed stewards of the land. It is a place of education, enjoyment and research that enhances the environmental health of the region.
Through the beauty of its natural setting, the diversity of its wildlife, and the scope and quality of its educational programs, demonstrations and research, Duke Farms inspires people to transform their approach to conservation and to start building a more sustainable future.

Jersey-Friendly Yards: Landscaping for a Healthy Environment
JerseyYards.org is a unique online resource development by the Barnegat Bay Partnership and the NJ Department of Environmental Protection to help New Jersey residents learn about low-impact landscaping. The site features in-depth information about threats to rivers and bays and practical advice to implement environmentally sound landscaping concepts. Two main components include a searchable database of New Jersey native and “Jersey-Friendly” plants as well as a fun Interactive Yard.
Going Native: A Guide to Landscaping with Native Plants in the Barnegat Bay Watershed (Downloadable pdf)

The Musconetcong Watershed Association (MWA)
The Musconetcong Watershed Association (MWA) is an independent, non-profit organization dedicated to protecting and improving the quality of the Musconetcong River and its Watershed, including its natural and cultural resources.
Musconetcong Watershed Association members are part of a network of individuals, families and organizations that care about the Musconetcong River and its watershed, and are dedicated to improving the watershed resources through public education and awareness programs, river water quality monitoring, promotion of sustainable land management practices and community involvement.
We believe that a community that is fully aware of the importance and vulnerability of its natural resources is a community that will actively support efforts to ensure environmental quality. We carry out our mission through grassroots activities including educational programs in local schools, municipal government outreach, workshops and seminars for the public, stream cleanups and outdoor educational programs. A Board of Trustees and committees that focus on specific activities oversee the operations and programs of the MWA. Four professional staff members conduct the daily operations of the Association.

The Native Plant Society of New Jersey
Find out everything there is to know about the native flora of New Jersey, learn from the experts on native plants, get the latest on interesting activities near you, or join one of the many opportunities to participate in the growing national native plant movement — right here in the Garden State.
The Native Plant Society of New Jersey is a statewide non-profit organization dedicated to the appreciation, protection, and study of the native flora of New Jersey. Founded in 1985, we have hundreds of members across the state, and are organized into county and regional chapters. Our members include gardeners, horticulturists, naturalists, landscape designers, students, and native plant enthusiasts from all walks of life.

Natural Lands Trust
Natural Lands Trust is a non-profit land conservation organization dedicated to protecting the forests, fields, streams, and wetlands that are essential to the sustainability of life in eastern Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey. We apply a comprehensive approach to conservation that includes permanently protecting natural areas, providing leadership in natural resource management, and creating opportunities for people to connect to and learn from nature.

Pinelands Preservation Alliance, Native Plant Resources, New Jersey
Pinelands Overview
The Pine Barrens of New Jersey is a unique, beautiful and fascinating natural treasure.
The Pinelands Preservation Alliance advocates for Pinelands preservation before government agencies like the New Jersey Pinelands Commission and seeks to educate the public about the Pinelands and the threats facing its natural resources.
Advocacy work is focused on four basic themes:

  • Monitoring public agencies, especially the Pinelands Commission,
  • Protecting the water quality of the Pine Barrens ecosystem,
  • Protecting the water supply embedded in the aquifers underlying the Pinelands and sustaining both the human and the natural communities of this region, and
  • Improving habitat protection for the distinctive, rare, threatened and endangered plant and animal species of the Pinelands.

New York

Finger Lakes Native Plant Society, New York
We are an organization located in central New York, founded in 1997, dedicated to promoting the appreciation of our native flora. We hold free public field trips throughout the year and free indoor programs during the colder months. Members receive our newsletter, Solidago, and participate in a seed exchange, a spring native plant sale, and a December celebration of native plants.

Habitat Gardening in Central New York, a chapter of Wild Ones: Native Plants, Natural Landscapes
Habitat Gardening in Central New York (HGCNY) started in March 2002 as “a garden club with a difference.”
In 2004, we became a chapter of Wild Ones: Native Plants, Natural Landscapes. It was a perfect fit for our efforts to preserve biodiversity by providing habitat for wildlife, especially by planting native plants. It also provided an opportunity for us to support this important national effort to promote native plants. We liked its model of having local chapters, meeting monthly, to inform and inspire people to make a difference in their own yards, even while each person’s efforts were collectively improving the habitat of the whole continent.

Long Island Native Plant Initiative, New York
LINPI conserves biodiversity by preserving the genetic heritage of Long Island’s native plant populations. This is accomplished by establishing commercial sources of local ecotypic (i.e. genetically native) seed and plants for native plant production, contributing to a regional seed bank, fostering a demand for native plants and serving as a propagation resource for the nursery industry. There is a focus on capturing as much genetic variation as possible when collecting and propagating plant material while minimizing the ecological impacts of harvest.

New York Flora Association
The New York Flora Association was founded in 1990 with the goal of promoting field botany and a greater understanding of the plants that grow wild in New York State. The goals of the organization are:

  • to promote the study of New York State’s Flora;
  • to encourage the production of botanical publications that are educational to the public and beneficial to the scientific community;
  • to provide an umbrella organization for field and herbarium botanists that can represent their points of view;
  • to serve as an information exchange for botanically related organizations and botanists active in New York State;
  • to foster the pursuit of common interests;
  • to support the continued development of the New York Flora Atlas; and
  • to promote conservation of native plants and natural communities.

Pennsylvania

Botanical Society of Western Pennsylvania
The Botanical Society of Western Pennsylvania (BSWP) is one of the oldest botanical organizations in the country. Since 1886, our members have met, botanized, and served as a resource of knowledge on the flowers of Pennsylvania.
Our group is a mixture of both professional and amateur botanists. BSWP meets monthly, September through June, and features excellent speakers. Field trips are frequent.

Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve
Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization that showcases an extraordinary diversity of plants native to Pennsylvania and the Delaware Valley region. We care for and protect our native plant collection with the goal of encouraging the public to visit, enjoy, and learn about the richness of Pennsylvania’s natural heritage.

Delaware Valley Fern & Wildflower Society, Pennsylvania
The purpose of the DVFWS shall be to encourage the enjoyment of ferns and wildflowers by cultivating and propagating them in the home garden; by studying them in their wild habitats, gardens, and conservatories; by promoting their conservation and preservation, and by providing a forum for the exchange of information and expertise.

iConserve Pennsylvania, Plant Smart
Not everyone has a green thumb or the ability to know how to plant that will save them time, energy, resources, plus do good things for the environment. What we plant, how we plant and where we plant can affect our wildlife, energy usage, carbon footprint and more.
In order to make wise planting decisions, it’s important to have the right tools, and we don’t just mean shovels and rakes! Become familiar with the benefits of native plants and trees and how they can help you and the environment. Natives not only look great, they require less care and provide more benefits to wildlife. They also can help keep invasive species at bay. Use our native plant database to identify some of the best natives to use to fit your needs. Our garden templates will inspire you to create an inviting and Earth-friendly landscape.

Natural Lands Trust
Natural Lands Trust is a non-profit land conservation organization dedicated to protecting the forests, fields, streams, and wetlands that are essential to the sustainability of life in eastern Pennsylvania and southern New Jersey. We apply a comprehensive approach to conservation that includes permanently protecting natural areas, providing leadership in natural resource management, and creating opportunities for people to connect to and learn from nature.

Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences, Agriculture Research & Cooperative Extension
Conserving Wild Bees in Pennsylvania (Downloadable pdf)

Pennsylvania Native Plant Society
The Pennsylvania Native Plants Society advocates conservation of native plants and their habitats and promotes the increased use of native plants in the landscape.
The Pennsylvania Native Plant Society had a beginning in 1979, when, through initiatives of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy, and the Pennsylvania Legislature, a movement was begun to recognize the rare and endangered plants of Pennsylvania and to set up organized efforts to produce a list of such plants and implement legislation for their study and protection. Through the efforts of Paul Weigman, Edgar T. Wherry and Carl Keener such a list was prepared in 1979 and updated frequently in subsequent years. To facilitate continuous management of data on the Pennsylvania flora and its rare, threatened and endangered components, the Rare Plant Committee was formed of any botanists with special interest in the flora of Pennsylvania who cared to join, and, from its inception, the Rare Plant Committee was designated a committee of the “Pennsylvania Native Plant Society.” Membership of the Committee and the Society were the same, and it consisted of volunteers who joined because they had botanical contributions to make or desired to be on a “Pennsylvania botanical information network.”
The only meetings were the annual meetings of the Rare Plant Committee, and 8 issues of a newsletter, The Truffula Seed, appeared between 1981 and 1986. General membership in the Pennsylvania Native Plant Society was not solicited until 1993, when a small group of botanically-dedicated Pennsylvanians, recognizing, among other things, the historical importance of Pennsylvania botany, joined together to transform the Society into a general-membership native plant organization which is now a Pennsylvania Non-Profit Corporation with headquarters in State College, Pennsylvania.

Virginia

Albemarle County, Virginia, Native Plant Database
Based on available science, the plants recommended here were found in this region prior to the arrival of the colonists at Jamestown, thus making them native plants. Native plants are historic to the region, help give us a sense of place, and are an important part of our local ecosystem. A panel of local experts chose these plants based on their current or potential availability, their overall aesthetic interest, and their likelihood to grow well without major care. This database allows everyone from the development community to the backyard enthusiast to search for native plants by uses and growing conditions.

Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora
The Digital Atlas of the Virginia Flora is the online successor to the Atlas of the Virginia Flora, which was published in three hard-copy editions between 1977 and 1992. Although it is still a work in progress in many respects, the Digital Atlas contains the most comprehensive information available on the geographic distribution of vascular plants in the Commonwealth.

Fairfax County, Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District (NVSWCD)
Working for clean streams and protected natural resources in Fairfax County.
The district’s annual seedling sale makes low-cost native shrub and tree seedlings available to Northern Virginia residents. Seedling packages go on sale each year in January and are available for pick-up in mid-April. Trees and shrubs help cleanse water, prevent soil erosion, provide habitat, cool our climate and clean our air. Consider adding native trees and shrubs to your community today!

Flora of Virginia Project
The Flora of Virginia Project was undertaken in 2001 to steer creation of the first comprehensive reference work on the native and naturalized plants of Virginia.

Green Spring Gardens, Fairfax County Park Authority, Virginia
Green Spring Gardens serves Fairfax County residents and visitors by advancing the awareness and practice of gardening. The gardens and educational programs focus on practical landscaping techniques that are appropriate for the Washington metro area. Additional programs emphasize historic influences on the land and Fairfax County residents’ role in preserving cultural resources. Open to the public are a horticulture center, library, demonstration gardens, a historic landscape and buildings, and a wooded stream valley with ponds.
USING NATIVE PLANTS TO ATTRACT BIRDS IN THE WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA AND VIRGINIA (Downloadable pdf)
USING NATIVE PLANTS TO ATTRACT BUTTERFLIES AND CLEARWING MOTHS IN THE WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA AND VIRGINIA (Downloadable pdf)
RECOMMENDED NATIVE HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS FOR SUNNY GARDENS IN THE WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA (Downloadable pdf)
RECOMMENDED NATIVE HERBACEOUS PERENNIALS AND FERNS FOR SHADE GARDENS IN THE WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA (Downloadable pdf)

The Ivy Creek Foundation in Charlottesville, Virginia is a non-profit organization whose mission is connecting people to our lands present and past.  The Ivy Creek Foundation:

Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy
Our Vision:  A county where people live in balance with wildlife and act with understanding of the value and importance of nature.
Our Mission:  Promote the preservation and proliferation of healthy wildlife habitats throughout Loudoun County by fostering an understanding of the value of nature and providing opportunities for applying that knowledge to the betterment of the natural environment.
Habitat Restoration

Plant ES Natives: They’re Shore Beautiful Campaign
Whether you want to put in a flower garden or establish or restore the landscape around your home, there are a great variety of Eastern Shore native plants from which to choose!  And you will have made the right choice!  Native plants not only offer many practical, low cost, and environmental benefits they also offer an appealing display of foliage and flowers!
Native Plants of Accomack and Northampton (Downloadable pdf)
Native Plants of Accomack and Northampton Guide Index (Downloadable pdf)

Plant NNK Natives: Go Native – Grow Native Campaign, Northern Neck Chapter of the Virginia Native Plant Society
The Go Native – Grow Native campaign seeks to inspire Northern Neck residents and businesses to use native plants in their gardens and protect native vegetation in the landscape.
A full-color guide entitled Northern Neck Native Plant Guide with sample garden plans that feature the plants. (Downloadable pdf)
Native plants provide many ecological benefits.  For example, they serve as sources of food (berries, seeds, nectar) and habitat year round for resident and migratory birds.  They also provide energy sources and host plants for many pollinators and their larvae, which in turn become bird food.  Native plants need less watering, so they assist in water conservation efforts important to maintaining a potable water supply on the Neck.  They absorb nutrients and soak up water before it runs off the ground helping to prevent stream pollution.  And, they typically require less fertilizer and fewer pesticides than non-native plants, thus reducing the introduction of pollutants to the environment.

Plant NoVA Natives Campaign
Plant NoVA Natives makes using native plants in the Northern Virginia landscape easy and fun, reaching out to homeowners, partnering with garden centers and supporting community leaders.
Native Plants for Northern Virginia (Downloadable pdf)
This guide showcases the attractive variety of plants native to Northern Virginia. Native plant species have evolved within specific regions and been dispersed throughout their range without known human involvement. These plants form the primary structure of the living landscape and provide food and shelter for native animal species.

Virginia Cooperative Extension, Arlington & Alexandria
Plant NOVA Natives?  Why are native plants important?  How do I select native plants?  Where can I buy native plants?
Best Best: Plants for Particular Uses, Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia
Tried-and-True Plants, Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia

Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation
The mission of the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) is to conserve Virginia’s natural and recreational resources. DCR supports a variety of environmental programs organized within six areas (Administration, Natural Heritage, Planning and Recreation Resources, Stormwater Management, State Parks, and Dam Safety and Floodplain Management) and numerous policy and/or advisory boards including the Board of Conservation and Recreation, Virginia Cave Board, Board on Conservation and Development of Public Beaches, and the Virginia Soil and Water Conservation Board).
Virginia Native Plant Finder
Native Plants for Conservation, Restoration & Landscaping — Virginia Coastal Plain (Downloadable pdf)
Native Plants for Conservation, Restoration & Landscaping — Virginia Grasslands (Downloadable pdf)
Native Plants for Conservation, Restoration & Landscaping — Virginia Mountain Region (Downloadable pdf)
Native Plants for Conservation, Restoration & Landscaping — Virginia Piedmont Region (Downloadable pdf)
Native Plants for Conservation, Restoration & Landscaping — Virginia Riparian Buffer Zones (Downloadable pdf)
Other fact sheets and brochures from stewardship to natural communities, animal and plant species and invasive alien plants.

VA Department of Game & Inland Fisheries: Habitat for Wildlife
Providing Water in Your Habitat at Home (Downloadable pdf) by Carol A. Heiser
Managing Land in the Piedmont of Virginia for the Benefit of Birds and Other Wildlife (Downloadable pdf)
Grow a Native Grass Meadow (Downloadable pdf) by Carol A. Heiser
Habitat at Home (Downloadable pdf) by Carol A. Heiser.  Includes a listing of native plants for your garden.
Native Alternatives to Invasive Plants
The Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ mission is:

  • to manage Virginia’s wildlife and inland fish to maintain optimum populations of all species to serve the needs of the Commonwealth;
  • to provide opportunity for all to enjoy wildlife, inland fish, boating and related outdoor recreation and to work diligently to safeguard the rights of the people to hunt, fish and harvest game as provided for in the Constitution of Virginia;
  • to promote safety for persons and property in connection with boating, hunting and fishing;
  • to provide educational outreach programs and materials that foster an awareness of and appreciation for Virginia’s fish and wildlife resources, their habitats, and hunting, fishing, and boating opportunities.

Virginia Native Plant Society
The Virginia Native Plant Society is dedicated to the protection and preservation of the native plants of Virginia and their habitats, in order to sustain for generations to come the integrity of the Commonwealth’s rich natural heritage of ecosystems and biodiversity for purposes of enjoyment, enlightenment, sustainable use, and our own very survival. To this end, we advocate and follow practices that will conserve our natural endowment, and we discourage and combat practices that will endanger or destroy it. We are committed to do all we can to slow the accelerating conversion of natural landscape to built and planted landscape and to reduce its damage to natural ecosystems.
Do I Have to Mow All That? (Downloadable pdf)
Hedgerows and Other Corners of Natural Diversity in Our Countryside Gardens (Downloadable pdf)
Meet the Natives (Downloadable pdf), VNSP South Hampton Roads Chapter, Virginia Beach, Virginia
Wildflowers for Butterfly Gardens (Downloadable pdf), Prince William Wildflower Society, Manassas, Virginia
Wildflowers for Woodland Gardens (Downloadable pdf), Prince William Wildflower Society, Manassas, Virginia
Native Alternatives to English Ivy (Downloadable pdf)

Washington DC

Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press: Grasses of Washington, DC (Downloadable pdf)
A vegetative key, descriptions, and illustrations for the identification of 182 native and naturalized grasses that occur in Washington, DC are presented.

West Virginia

West Virginia Native Plant Society
Dedicated to the conservation and appreciation of West Virginia’s native plants and habitats.
Gardening with West Virginia Native Plants (2012) (Downloadable pdf)