2021 Native Plant Sales & Events

The Native Plant Sales & Events calendar is updated regularly so check back often. Contact us to add an event.

DELAWARE, MARYLAND, NEW JERSEY, PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, WASHINGTON DC, WEST VIRGINIA

EVERYWHERE: Look for your county’s upcoming spring native shrub and tree seedling sales. These young plants are offered to homeowners at an irresistible price.

EVERYWHERE: Doug Tallamy’s Homegrown National Park: A GRASSROOTS CALL-TO-ACTION TO RESTORE BIODIVERSITY – NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY – GET DIGGING AND GET ON THE MAP!

MARYLAND: Marylanders Plant Trees was launched in 2009 to encourage citizens and organizations to partner with the State to plant new trees. Today, citizens can still take advantage of our coupon program to receive $25 off the purchase of a native tree at 86 participating nurseries across the State.

NEW JERSEY: The South Jersey Landscape Makeover Program is a unique program to provide homeowners, municipalities, and farmers with expert advice and financial assistance to create rain gardens and other “green infrastructure” projects that capture polluted stormwater and prevent it from entering our lakes, rivers, and bays. We’ll host a series of rain garden design workshops and offer free technical advice and funding for homeowners and municipalities. Farm owners will also be eligible for grants to implement stormwater best management practices. This program is for select municipalities in the Rancocas River, Hammonton, Salem, and Maurice-Cohansey River watersheds, but there may be opportunities in other municipalities depending on the project and location.

PENNSYLVANIA: Pennsylvania Game Commission’s Howard Nursery produces bare-root seedlings for wildlife food and cover on State Game Lands. The nursery has been producing and distributing 2 to 8 million seedlings annually for wildlife food and cover since 1954. All Pennsylvania landowners may purchase seedlings for wildlife food and cover, watershed protection, soil erosion control, and for reclamation of disturbed areas, such as surface mine site and utility right-of-ways.

VIRGINIA: Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District’s Native Seedling Sale. The Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District’s annual seedling sale makes low-cost bare-root native shrub and tree seedlings available to Northern Virginia residents. The 2021 bare-root seedling sale features small shrubs and trees which are hardy in small spaces and bear gorgeous flowers and fruits, and display beautiful colors. The fruits and flowers that these plants grow are important food sources to birds and pollinators! By planting these native species, you are directly contributing to the betterment of our environment. The plants in each package clean our water and air, prevent soil erosion, provide valuable habitat, and add beauty to your property. View the seedlings available in each package below, and be sure to order early! In 2020, our packages sold out within a week! Orders open on Tuesday, February 2, 2021. You must purchase your seedlings in advance, no day of sales or extras will be offered.

VIRGINIA: Grants and Discounts: list courtesy Plant NOVA Natives.

VIRGINIA: My Tree Counts – Help the VDOF. Every tree planted makes a difference to the health of our communities and the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The Virginia Department of Forestry (VDOF) and partners want to highlight tree planting projects from across the state. This year (October 1, 2020 – September 30, 2021) the goal for Northern Virginia is 28,500 trees and shrubs. Submit your tree planting to show that your tree counts towards Virginia’s efforts to #ProtectOurBay! We’ll share these stories on the Community Tree Map and social media with #MyTreeCounts.

Your regional Native Plant Society is the perfect resource for not only native plant sales but also information, field trips and other events:

Delaware Native Plant Society
Maryland Native Plant Society
The Native Plant Society of New Jersey
Pennsylvania Native Plant Society
Virginia Native Plant Society

PENNSYLVANIA/Virtual Event
January 10
The Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College: Doug Tallamy: A Guide to Restoring the Little Things That Run the World
A recent UN report predicts that as many as 1 million species will soon disappear because of human activities. Many of these are insects and nearly all species at risk, including humans, rely on insects. So how do we create beautiful landscapes brimming with the life that runs the ecosystems we depend on? Tallamy will remind us of the essential roles insects play, and describe the simple changes we must make in our landscapes and our attitudes to keep insects on the ground, in the air and yes, on our plants. Registration is free but required.

CONNECTICUT/Virtual Event
January 14
Interreligious Eco-Justice Network: Doug Tallamy: Nature’s Best Hope
Recent headlines about global insect declines and three billion fewer birds in North America are a bleak reality check about how ineffective our current landscape designs have been at sustaining the plants and animals that sustain us. Such losses are not an option if we wish to continue our current standard of living on Planet Earth. The good news is that none of this is inevitable. Doug Tallamy will discuss simple steps that each of us can- and must- take to reverse declining biodiversity and will explain why we, ourselves, are nature’s best hope. Registration is free but required.

VIRGINIA/Virtual Event
January 14
Virginia Native Plant Society Potowmack Chapter: Climate Change and the Need to Make Space for Nature with Charles Smith [via Zoom]
Current shifts in the natural world differ from past changes because they are occurring so rapidly and so much of the Earth’s surface has been altered, reducing both the available habitat and the seed source for plant communities to move. There is a need to act on a large and small scale to counteract the impacts and preserve biodiversity. All of us have a role in preserving species and natural communities. We will discuss what we can do to make room for nature. We will look at current data on the state of the earth, the importance of plant communities to include keystone species, and concepts from restoration science and efforts described by Doug Tallamy and others that can be taken.

EVERYWHERE
January 18
MLK Day of Service
The Martin Luther King Jr. holiday on Jan. 18, 2021, is the 26th anniversary of the day of service that celebrates the Civil Rights leader’s life and legacy. Observed each year on the third Monday in January as “a day on, not a day off,” MLK Day is the only federal holiday designated as a national day of service to encourage all Americans to volunteer to improve their communities. AmeriCorps has been charged to lead this effort for the last quarter century. We look forward to your engagement and accomplishments in Dr. King’s memory.

PENNSYLVANIA/Virtual Event
January 21 & 22, 28 & 29
Morris Arboretum Landscape Design Symposium 2021
The 2021 Ecological Landscape Design Symposium, going virtual this year, explores how ecology, culture, and design can be incorporated into real-world contemporary practice. This program is geared to landscape practitioners in the New England and Mid-Atlantic regions of the US. Featured topics: Examples of collaboration between horticulture, restoration, and landscape architecture; Ideas to incorporate plant community analysis into design; Embracing cultures in landscape design. Fee.

NEW HAMPSHIRE/Virtual Event
January 22
Ecological Landscape Alliance: Grassroot Seed Propagation of Native Plants
Growing native plants from seed is a different way to interact with our native flora and an inexpensive way to produce a lot of plants. The seeds of wild plants have a very different set of needs than those of garden and vegetable species. Timing is crucial and fall and winter are ideal times to sow the seeds of many species. In this webinar, Heather McCargo will describe the reproductive life cycle of many different types of native plants and explain how we can change our landscape practices to help support wild plant reproduction and survival. Then she will describe simple outdoor seed sowing methods that anyone can use to grow their own seedlings. Fee.

NEW HAMPSHIRE/Virtual Event
January 27
Ecological Landscape Alliance: Expanding Biodiversity – Attracting Birds to Your Yard
Witness winter wildlife all around Virginia Beach; whether it’s following fascinating bird activity, exploring the natural areas of our community or the musings of harbor seals . Learn what it takes to properly observe and identify wildlife in their natural settings. Registration now open. Fee.

PENNSYLVANIA/Virtual Event
January 21 & 22, 28 & 29
Morris Arboretum Landscape Design Symposium 2021
The 2021 Ecological Landscape Design Symposium, going virtual this year, explores how ecology, culture, and design can be incorporated into real-world contemporary practice. This program is geared to landscape practitioners in the New England and Mid-Atlantic regions of the US. Featured topics: Examples of collaboration between horticulture, restoration, and landscape architecture; Ideas to incorporate plant community analysis into design; Embracing cultures in landscape design. Fee.

VIRGINIA/Virtual Event
January 28
Blue Ridge PRISM: Invasive Plant Control in Winter
Winter is for hot chocolate, warm fires, and controlling invasive plants. Yes! It is a great time of year to tackle some of the invasive plants found in our area. Find out which plants you can treat, which you need to wait to treat, and how to do winter control safely and effectively. You will have the opportunity to ask your questions live to our panel of experts. No fee.

VIRGINIA/Virtual Event
February 6
3rd Annual Stop Mowing, Start Growing: Native Plants for Beginners!
Whether you are new native plants and what they can do for your property or looking for alternative landscaping ideas this event is for you! Native plants can: create a beautiful yard; save time so you can enjoy other activities; create habitat for birds & pollinators; save money on fertilizer & pesticides; improve water quality; curb erosion. Let us help you to stop mowing and get going on your dream landscape! Registration Fee: $5.00

VIRGINIA/Virtual Event
February 11
Virginia Native Plant Society Potowmack Chapter: Life in Your Wild Garden with Laura Beaty (via Zoom)
Growing numbers of gardeners are incorporating native plants into their landscapes in an effort to mitigate the growing loss of pollinators and leafeaters.  This loss is global and compromises interactions in a natural habitats worldwide. Here at home, many gardeners have been surprised by what they are observing in their wild gardens. Join us to see inside a wild garden — then look deeper into yours.

DELAWARE/Virtual Event
February 13
Mt. Cuba Center presents The Humane Gardener: Nurturing Habitats for Wildlife
Why do we call some insects “beneficial” while others are “pests”? Why do we welcome some larger animals to our garden while calling others “nuisances”? Why are some plants considered “desirable” while others are “weeds”? In this myth-busting talk, learn how common gardening methods perpetuate misperceptions about the wild species living among us. Discover practical ways to put humane gardening philosophies into action by protecting nesting sites, eliminating unintended hazards, identifying and nurturing plants that provide food and shelter, and humanely resolving conflicts with mammals and other commonly misunderstood creatures. Fee.

PENNSYLVANIA/Virtual Event
February 18
Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve’s 21st Annual Land Ethics Symposium: Creative Approaches for Ecological Landscaping
Come celebrate the 21st year of this not-to-be-missed symposium geared towards landscape architects, designers, contractors, land planners, municipal officials and homeowners. The symposium’s focus: how to create ecologically sound and economically viable landscapes through the use of native plants and sustainable practices. This year, expect lively dialog on topics ranging the restoration of the American chestnut to the future of urban park design. Fee.

MARYLAND/Virtual Event
February 19
Montgomery County GreenScapes Symposium: Back to Our Roots: Leveraging Native Plants to Restore the Environment
Years of rapid urbanization have fragmented natural habitats with manicured lawns and barren over-development leading to significant declines in biodiversity. How can you reverse this alarming trend? Join us for a fascinating day of innovative presentations that dig deep into how native plants can restore natural ecosystems in a range of landscapes, from backyards and public gardens to urban and commercial projects. Experts will tackle the native vs. non-native plant debate: Is a native plant-only prescription necessary? Under what conditions should non-native plants be incorporated, and what are the risks of using cultivars? Join the conversation as experts assess the scope of environmental benefits that native ecosystems create, such as decreasing pollution and fighting climate change. We’ll explore the latest strategies to combat pollinator population collapse, considering key factors like pollination syndromes, specialist pollinators, plant genetics and floral balance. Speakers will demonstrate the latest tools to assess the sustainability of sites, including best practices for evidence-based designs that maximize the ecological, social and economic benefits of native landscapes. Key note: Nature’s Best Hope, Doug Tallamy, Professor & Chair, Department of Entomology & Wildlife Ecology, University of Delaware.

VIRGINIA/Virtual Event
February 20
The 17th Annual EcoSavvy Symposium: Integrating Storm Water Management in Landscape Design
Learn innovative techniques to capture, store and collect rainwater. 9:30am – 12:30 pm; Cost: $26 in-county/$28 out-of-county; Registration (703) 642-5173 or online at www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/parktakes; Code ITG.QARB.

VIRGINIA/Virtual Event
February 21
Green Spring Gardens Winter Lecture Series: Doug Tallamy & Nature’s Best Hope
Recent headlines about global insect declines and 3 billion fewer birds in North America are a bleak reality check about how ineffective our current landscape designs have been at sustaining the plants and animals that sustain us. Such losses are not an option if we wish to continue our current standard of living on Planet Earth. The good news is that none of this is inevitable. Doug Tallamy will discuss simple steps that each of us can and must take to reverse declining biodiversity and will explain why we, ourselves, are nature’s best hope. This program will be offered virtually with an emailed link. $10 Fee.

MASSACHUSETTS/Virtual Event
March 3 – 4
Ecological Landscape Alliance Conference & Eco-Marketplace 2021
Looking for Innovative Landscape Solutions and Inspiration? Join ELA on March 3 & 4, 2021 for the 27th Conference & Eco-Marketplace – all online.  We’ll energize your practice and prepare you for spring with two full days of research and field-tested expertise, as well as innovative case studies on a wide range of topics. Fee.

CONNECTICUT/Virtual Event
March 10
Samford Museum & Nature Center: Doug Tallamy & Nature’s Best Hope
Join us for a live, interactive event with award winning author, Douglas Tallamy, Ph.D., Professor of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware. Author of 2008’s “Bringing Nature Home,” which was awarded the Silver Medal by the Garden Writer’s Association, Tallamy has followed up with his latest book “Nature’s Best Hope.” Tallamy will discuss simple steps that each of us can, and must, take to reverse declining biodiversity and will explain why we, ourselves, are nature’s best hope. Signed book will be available for purchase through Barrett Bookstore. Fee.

MARYLAND/Virtual Event
March 15
Pickering Creek Audubon Center: Nature’s Best Hope with Entomologist Doug Tallamy
Recent headlines about global insect declines and three billion fewer birds in North America are a bleak reality check about how ineffective our current landscape designs have been at sustaining the plants and animals that sustain us.  Such losses are not an option if we wish to continue our current standard of living on Planet Earth. The good news is that none of this is inevitable. Join Pickering Creek as Dr. Doug Tallamy will discuss simple steps that each of us can- and must- take to reverse declining biodiversity and will explain why we, ourselves, are nature’s best hope. $7 fee.

NEW YORK/Virtual Event
March 19 & 20
Ithaca Native Landscape Symposium
INLS 2021 will be held virtually on Friday, March 19th and Saturday, March 20th in the comfort of your own home or office.  All of the 2020 speakers have agreed to return to the 2021 conference. We are working with Flair Communications to make the conference as fun and engaging as Zoom possible. We look forward to all being together in 2022 at Cinemapolis. Fee.

VIRGINIA/Virtual Event
March 20 – STAY TUNED!
Loudoun County Master Gardeners Annual Gardening Symposium
Due to COVID-19 still unknown in 2021, we will be holding a virtual Symposium. Watch this space!

VIRGINIA/Virtual Event
March 20
Gardening in the Northern Neck: Be Intentional: Create Livable, Edible, Sustainable Garden Spaces
The Northern Neck Master Gardeners (NNMG) Association is pleased to announce that the Gardening in the Northern Neck seminar (GNN) will return on Saturday, March 20, 2021, after a one-year hiatus due to COVID-19. This will be the 27th Gardening in the Northern Neck Seminar. The theme of the seminar is “Be Intentional: Create Livable, Edible, Sustainable Garden Spaces.” The 2021 seminar speakers are nationally recognized for their innovative approaches to gardening. Speakers will be Brie Arthur, a celebrated speaker, bestselling author, and known for her leadership with the Foodscape movement; Nancy Lawson, a habitat consultant and national speaker on garden ecology; and Vincent Simeone, horticulturist, lecturer, and garden writer. The fee for the virtual seminar is $25.

CONNECTICUT/Virtual Event
March 23
Fairfield University Art Museum: Doug Tallamy’s Nature’s Best Hope
On Tuesday, March 23rd, at 5 p.m. Douglas Tallamy, Professor of Entomology at University of Delaware, will give a virtual lecture titled “Nature’s Best Hope.” Tallamy shows how homeowners everywhere can turn their yards into conservation corridors that provide wildlife habitats. This event is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Birds of the Northeast: Gulls to Great Auks. Learn more about the exhibition here. No registration required.

EVERYWHERE!
April  22
Earth Day 2021
When life around the globe returns to normal, our world cannot return to business-as-usual. Our global community has been shocked by the largest global crisis in a generation. COVID-19 has shown us the necessity of thinking ahead, but the next crises are already on their way. Climate change, species loss, pandemics and massive natural disasters might define the future — unless we do something now. We have the solutions, both natural and technological… we just need the will. Join EARTHDAY.ORG and over 1 billion participants around the world and take action on April 22nd. TOGETHER, WE WILL RESTORE OUR EARTH.

VIRGINIA/Virtual Event
April  22-25
Colonial Williamsburg’s Annual Garden Symposium: Celebrate Planet Earth: Giving Back With Our Gardens
In recognition of Earth Day on April 22, we invite you to join us from your home or garden, as we examine garden designs, gardening practices, and plant choices that embrace nature yet beautify the landscape. Guest speakers and Colonial Williamsburg horticultural staff will share some of their best practices for creating gardens that are sustainable and earth-friendly. While we may not be able to gather together in a large group to enjoy this conference, each registrant will receive a multi-day ticket voucher to redeem for a future visit to enjoy our historic and iconic gardens at a time most convenient to you! After a year where many dove headlong into the art of gardening—many perhaps for the first time—now seems perfect to address the relationship between gardeners and the environments in which they practice their skills. Opening Keynote Speaker, national gardening television host, Joe Lamp’l, will provide practical information to help us all become better, smarter gardeners. Professor and researcher, Doug Tallamy, will share how we are nature’s best hope for biodiversity, and David Mizejewski, spokesperson for the National Wildlife Federation, will share a whole new perspective on gardening.  Award winning authors Anne Spafford and Nancy Lawson will discuss creating successful gardens for pollinators and other wildlife. Registration expected to launch by January 4, 2021. 

NEW JERSEY/Virtual & Field Event
April  24 – STAY TUNED!
Stockton University’s 32nd Annual Pinelands Short Course
Panel Discussion via zoom in the morning; on location field trips in the afternoon (space will be limited). Registration opening soon!

NEW JERSEY
July 11
The Silent Majority: Moths of New Jersey, Cape May City
If novelty in nature is your thing and you relish the opportunity to immerse yourself in her variety, color, shape, form and function than this presentation by Blaine Rothhauser is for you. With 110,000 species of moth worldwide, one can be kept pretty entertained trying to get a peek into their secret lives. Under appreciated cousins of butterflies’ moths are truly the silent majority of the Stygian world. During this presentation you will learn the basics of moth biology, facts about individual species, and be provided with all the necessary tools to spend a little nocturnal time enjoying for yourself these nighttime jewels.

NEW JERSEY
July 12
D&R Greenway Land Trust Native Plant Sale, Princeton
D&R Greenway’s Native Plant Nursery is dedicated to restoring a rich diversity of native flora to the local landscape. We supply plants for ecological restoration projects, school projects and to the general public for use in home gardens. The Nursery stocks over 50 species of native plants, which are essential for native wildlife and for ecosystem function. These include trees, shrubs, perennial wildflowers, grasses, sedges & ferns. These plants are purchased from reputable native plant growers.

OHIO
July 12 – 14
Mothapalooza!, West Portsmouth
Mothapalooza is a celebration of the rich and stunningly beautiful world of moths. Their much better known diurnal counterparts the butterflies are dwarfed by the diversity of moths. Fewer than 140 butterfly species have been recorded in Ohio; there are an estimated 3,000 species of moths. We know from the previous four Mothapaloozas that participants can expect to see a blizzard of moths, numbering into hundreds of species. The weekend program features an interesting range of talks by leading experts, Break-out Sessions and field trips to experience moths and other elements of natural history firsthand.

VIRGINIA
July 13
Master Gardeners of Prince William’s Saturday in the Garden: Wildlife Gardening with the Humane Gardener, Bristow
Why do we call some insects “beneficial” while others are “pests”? Why are some plants considered “desirable” while others are “weeds”? In this myth-busting talk by Nancy Lawson, learn how common growing methods divide the natural world into false dichotomies and perpetuate misperceptions about the wild species living among us. Discover practical ways to put humane gardening philosophies into action by protecting wildlife nurseries, eliminating unintended hazards, nurturing plants that provide food and shelter, and humanely resolving conflicts with mammals and other commonly misunderstood creatures.

MARYLAND
July 17
Natural History Society of Maryland presents: Bees of Maryland, Baltimore
Did you know that there are approximately 4000 species of bees in the United States, 800 species east of the Mississippi River, and over 400 species in Maryland?  Little is known about the populations of most of these species.  In 2009, Gene Scarpulla conducted a yearlong survey of the bees on Hart-Miller Island to increase our knowledge of Maryland’s bees.  In 2015, Gene coordinated a cooperative survey of the bees of Poplar Island with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  Gene’s talk is based on his Hart-Miller Island survey.  He will give a brief overview of the history of Hart-Miller Island, describe his yearlong survey, discuss general bee biology, and show the marvelous diversity of bee species that can be found in Maryland.

DELAWARE
July 20
Nanticoke Watershed Alliance presents: Native Trees for the Birds & the Bees & the Seas, Laurel
Native trees clean our air, provide cooling shade on balmy summer days, reduce road noise, and block wind. Their deep roots also uptake water and nutrients, reducing flooding and pollution. Incredibly, they also provide habitat and food for a wide range of critters, including butterflies, bees, birds, squirrels, and us! Join Nanticoke Watershed Alliance at our “Native Trees for the Birds and the Bees and the Seas” workshop and learn about the many roles that native trees play in the wild (and could play in your yard). Would you like to dig in native trees, but you aren’t sure which ones to plant? Are you overwhelmed or underwhelmed by choice and just can’t find the right trees for your space? This workshop will help you determine which native trees could work in your landscape and give you an opportunity to add trees to your landscape at no cost.

MARYLAND
July 28
Chesapeake Natives Plant Nursery’s Open Greenhouse Day, Upper Marlboro
Shop the best quality native plants in Maryland, grown from locally gathered native seed on site at Mt. Airy. Let us help you find the right native plants for your space. If you can not make any of these sales you always have the option to shop our selection of native plants by appointment!